Quincy Davis at the forefront of Taipei basketball's growth

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Quincy Davis at the forefront of Taipei basketball's growth

When Quincy Davis became Chinese Taipei's first naturalized player in international basketball, it did not take long for him to make his presence felt. He first donned Taipei's national kit in the FIBA Asia Championship 2013, where he helped the island nation make one of their biggest statements ever, finishing among the top four for the first time since 1999.

Davis gave an outstanding account of himself in that tournament, averaging 14.7 points and 9.0 rebounds per game, including dropping a personal best of 26 points, 10 boards and 3 blocks as Taipei defeated rivals China in the Quarter-Finals. He has been a mainstay of the national squad for the past few years, and he has been a tremendous part of basketball's growth in the country.

Davis's impact has also been evident in Taipei's club circuit - the Super Basketball League (SBL). The 2.03m center has been a mainstay of perennial title favorites Pauian, leading them to four straight championships from 2012 to 2015. Their success enabled them to represent Taipei in the recent FIBA Asia Champions Cup 2016 that was held in China.

Davis was a tower of power as Pauian's lone import in that competition, and though the team did not make it past the Quarter-Finals, he still impressed with 18.3 points and 11.3 rebounds per contest.

Davis recently talked to FIBA about his experience at the Champions Cup and how much basketball has grown in his adopted country.

What can you say about Pauian's experience in the FIBA Asia Champions Cup?
Pauian experience with FIBA was very important to help improve our basketball knowledge and development internationally.

How did that experience in the Champions Cup help the preparations of the team for the 2016-2017 SBL season?
Playing in the FIBA Champions Cup prepared our young team to become stronger mentally and physically, especially against great competition.

What is the worth of having a continental club tournament like the Champions Cup for teams like Pauian?
I believe the worth of the FIBA Champions Cup is priceless because it gives players that have never played on the national team a taste of what it is like to play against international players. It is also a great chance to develop their skills.

How has Chinese Taipei basketball improved since you first became a naturalized player? What's the big reason for this?
Taipei basketball has grown significantly since I have become a citizen. It's really an awesome feeling to see kids inspired about competing in such a fun game. I have seen a lot of parents have changed their way of traditional thinking, and they have allowed their kids to enjoy this game while also doing well with their academic education.


Share this24/01/2017
ASIA

Quincy Davis at the forefront of Taipei basketball's growth

[50 Quincy Spencer Davis Iii (TPE)]
50 Quincy Spencer Davis Iii (TPE) - China v Chinese Taipei, 2016 FIBA Asia Challenge (IRI), Tehran(Islamic Republic of Iran), Second Round, 14 September 2016

TAIPEI (FIBA Asia Cup 2017) - When Quincy Davis became Chinese Taipei's first naturalized player in international basketball, it did not take long for him to make his presence felt. He first donned Taipei's national kit in the FIBA Asia Championship 2013, where he helped the island nation make one of their biggest statements ever, finishing among the top four for the first time since 1999.

Davis gave an outstanding account of himself in that tournament, averaging 14.7 points and 9.0 rebounds per game, including dropping a personal best of 26 points, 10 boards and 3 blocks as Taipei defeated rivals China in the Quarter-Finals. He has been a mainstay of the national squad for the past few years, and he has been a tremendous part of basketball's growth in the country.

Davis's impact has also been evident in Taipei's club circuit - the Super Basketball League (SBL). The 2.03m center has been a mainstay of perennial title favorites Pauian, leading them to four straight championships from 2012 to 2015. Their success enabled them to represent Taipei in the recent FIBA Asia Champions Cup 2016 that was held in China.

Davis was a tower of power as Pauian's lone import in that competition, and though the team did not make it past the Quarter-Finals, he still impressed with 18.3 points and 11.3 rebounds per contest.

Davis recently talked to FIBA about his experience at the Champions Cup and how much basketball has grown in his adopted country.

What can you say about Pauian's experience in the FIBA Asia Champions Cup?
Pauian experience with FIBA was very important to help improve our basketball knowledge and development internationally.

How did that experience in the Champions Cup help the preparations of the team for the 2016-2017 SBL season?
Playing in the FIBA Champions Cup prepared our young team to become stronger mentally and physically, especially against great competition.

What is the worth of having a continental club tournament like the Champions Cup for teams like Pauian?
I believe the worth of the FIBA Champions Cup is priceless because it gives players that have never played on the national team a taste of what it is like to play against international players. It is also a great chance to develop their skills.

How has Chinese Taipei basketball improved since you first became a naturalized player? What's the big reason for this?
Taipei basketball has grown significantly since I have become a citizen. It's really an awesome feeling to see kids inspired about competing in such a fun game. I have seen a lot of parents have changed their way of traditional thinking, and they have allowed their kids to enjoy this game while also doing well with their academic education.

What is your earnest wish and plan for Chinese Taipei basketball in the future?
I hope for the future improvement of Chinese Taipei basketball and sports in general, we can invest more time and resources in the development of our young athletes. We can do this through state-of-the-art facilities and education about strength, conditioning and nutrition.

Do you think Chinese Taipei can be a competitive team this year, especially with the new FIBA Competition System?
I think Chinese Taipei can be competitive this year with FIBA because I have seen much improvement in the players through our local league, the SBL. Indeed, I believe our future is very bright!